Research with Relevance - Friday Features

 
Research with Relevance
  • With an emphasis on research with relevance, KSU's research portfolio is varied and far-reaching, leading to new knowledge and discoveries by faculty and hands-on opportunities for students. Research with Relevance - Friday Features, a new interactive web show produced by the Office of Research, gives an inside look into the varied research and scholarly activities taking place at Kennesaw State University.

    The one-hour web show is streamed live via Microsoft Teams, a free easy-to-use “virtual meeting” platform/app. Phaedra Corso, vice president for research at KSU, facilitates discussions with KSU researchers, focusing on how their efforts are making meaningful impacts locally and beyond. 

    The web show, free and open to the public, includes a live interview and an interactive question-and-answer period with the virtual audience. 

Spring 2020 Show Archives

The Office of Research has just concluded its inaugural season of Research with Relevance - Friday Features. Please explore the archives below if you missed any episodes. 

  • Dr. Chris Cornelison directs the Office of Intellectual Property Development, a new support unit established within the Office of Research in spring 2020. Dr. Jonathan McMurry co-founded New Echota Biotechnology with the late Dr. John C. Salerno, a start-up venture based on intellectual property held by the Kennesaw State University Research and Service Foundation. Mr. Greg Quinet, executive director, and Dr. Birton Cowden, research director, both from the Robin and Doug Shore Entrepreneurship Center in the Michael J. Coles College of Business, support entrepreneurship across KSU.

    Research Overview

    These faculty are examples of how KSU is taking Research with Relevance and advacing into markets. Together they represent the innovative spirit of KSU faculty, staff and students as well as KSU's commitment to transitioning research and scholarship out of the academic setting and into commercial markets.

    Research Video

    Episode Video

  • Dr. Katherine H. Ingram is an associate professor of exercise science in the Department of Exercise Science and Sport Managment in the WellStar College of Health and Human Services. She also serves as the founder and director of the KSU for FitKids program. Her research, pertaining to the influence of obesity and physical activity on cardiometabolic health, has resulted in numerous articles in prestigious scientific journals.    

    Dr. Ingram’s interdisciplinary research team includes Dr. Janeen Amason, an associate professor of  nursing in the WellStar School of Nursing, KSU students from across multiple colleges, and several collaborators from within and outside of KSU. With expertise in obstetric care, Dr. Amason's research interests focus on gestational diabetes and the increased risk of Type 2 diabetes in women diagnosed as well as the increased risk of obesity and diabetes in children exposed to high glucose levels during pregnancy. 

    Research Overview

    The Ingram laboratory examines the influence of obesity and inactivity on diabetes during pregnancy and is currently studying the novel use of obesity and inactivity measures as early predictors of risk for gestational diabetes. 

    The goal of this research is to improve care for obese women during pregnancy and mitigate the impact of transgenerational obesity and diabetes on the child.  

    Research Video

    Episode Video  

  • Dr. Philip Kiernan, an associate professor of art history in the School of Art and Design in the College of the Arts, focuses his research on the art and archaeology of the Roman Empire, and involves archaeological fieldwork, as well as work with statues, bronze artifacts, and coins. He also serves as the coordinator for the university’s interdisciplinary minor in Classical Studies. He just published a book - Roman Cult Images: The Lives and Worship of Idols from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity - with Cambridge University Press. He is developing a collaborative project on the cultural heritage of Montepulciano, which has most recently involved the digitization of renaissance manuscripts in the town’s archive, and the documentation of a collection of Etruscan and Roman reliefs and inscriptions by KSU students.  

    Research Overview

    Visiting a temple was an incredibly important experience for ancient Romans. In two pilot projects in 2018 and 2019, KSU students worked to reconstruct that experience by excavating the area around a temple to Mars at the site of Wareswald in Germany.

    Finds from the site include evidence for ritual washing, a second temple building, weapon offerings made to the gods, and more! Thanks to a matching grant from the Halle Foundation, further work in the area is envisaged next summer, and will provide students with a remarkable international research experience, as well as yielding more information about Roman religion.

    Research Video

    Episode Video

  • Dr. Kevin McFall, an associate professor of mechatronics engineering in the Southern Polytechnic College of Engineering and Engineering Technology (SPCEET), and Dr. Mohammed Aledhari, assistant professor of computer science in the College of Computing and Software Engineering (CCSE), teamed up in 2019 to advance autonomous vehicle technology and train KSU undergraduate students to use it. Dr. McFall, who also serves as assistant dean for research in SPCEET, explores research topics on autonomous vehicles and deep learning, directing numerous student teams to develop sensor systems and actuation control for self-driving cars and robots. Dr. Aledhari, who is also director of the Smart and Autonomous Systems Center (SASC) at KSU, has research interests in data science, machine learning, computer vision for medical imaging and autonomous systems, and big data problems in computational biology and bioinformatics.

    Research Overview

    Just about every new car today is sold with autonomous features like adaptive cruise control, lane keeping, and automatic braking for collision avoidance. Autonomous vehicle technology combines sensors, control systems, mechanics, machine learning, and computer vision.

    Dr. McFall and Dr. Aledhari combined their expertise to advance autonomous vehicle technology and improve transportation safety, convenience, and mobility for all. Their work is paving the way for more completely autonomous vehicles, and training undergraduate students to compete in the rapidly growing job market for robotics, automation, and artificial intelligence.

    Research Video

    Episode Video

  • Dr. Brett Katzman, a professor of economics in the Michael J. Coles College of Business, and Dr. Sean Ellermeyer, a professor of mathematics in the College of Science and Mathematics combined forces to fix one of the largest auctions in history. Dr. Katzman, who also serves as associate dean of research and chair of the Department of Economics, Finance, and Quantitative Analysis, focuses his research in the areas of game theory, microeconomics, and more specifically, auction and bargaining. Dr. Ellermeyer, who also serves as chair of the Department of Mathematics, conducts research in the areas of differential equations, dynamical systems, mathematical modeling and more recently, game theory and auction theory. 

    Research Overview

    Auctions are used to sell goods and procure services world wide.  Auction theory has been developed as a branch of economics to study bidding behavior and auction design by applying game theory. The research of Dr. Katzman and Dr. Ellermeyer uses auction theory to identify fatal flaws in the largest auction ever conducted: the multi-billion dollar Medicare auction. 

    Research Video

    Episode Video

  • Dr. Alice Gooding's interest in bones developed into two research labs she now leads at KSU. Dr. Gooding is an assistant professor of anthropology in the Department of Geography and Anthropology and her speciality is biological (also known as physical) anthropology and osteology in particular. Dr. Gooding directs the Bone Biomechanics Lab in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Forensic Anthropology Field Lab at the KSU Field Station. Her research areas include bone biomechanics, craniometrics, and blast force trauma to the skeleton. Dr. Gooding is also a practicing forensic anthropologist for the state of Georgia.

    Research Overview 

    The skeleton is one of the most fascinating parts of the body. By examining variation in skeletal structure, fundamental questions can be answered about human health today and in past populations. That knowledge can be then used to have a profound impact on the science of identifying deceased individuals and preparing medico-legal professionals to best serve their communities.

    Research Video

    Episode Video

  • Dr. Mark Patterson and Dr. Nancy Hoalst-Pullen in the Department of Geography and Anthropology in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences have partnered on research focusing on the geographies of beer.  They have co-edited two academic volumes on the subject: The Geography of Beer: Regions, Environment and Societies in 2014, followed up by The Geography of Beer: Culture and Economics in 2020.  The geography professors have also traveled more than 160,000 miles across 28 countries to reveal the most unique, historic and delicious brews across the globe, culminating in a book published by National Geographic in 2017 - ATLAS OF BEER: A Globe-Trotting Journey Through the World of Beer

    Research Overview

    Beer is a story about geography. It is a story about how and why local plants and ingredients are fermented and the myriad of roles it has played within almost every culture and society. This research examines various influences, relationships, and developments of beer from distinctly spatial perspectives, exploring the functions of beer and brewing from unique and sometimes overlapping cultural, economic, and environmental viewpoints. In other words, the researchers will discuss how - and why - beer is liquid geography in a glass.

    Episode Video

  • Dr. Chris Cornelison and Dr. Kyle Gabriel of the BioInnovation Laboratory in the College of Science and Mathematics are using innovative technology to expand the opportunities for mushroom production in unlikely places such as urban environments and nonarable lands. Dr. Cornelison, lab director and assistant professor of microbiology, and Dr. Gabriel, a research scientist in the BioInnovation Laboratory, conceived a plan to build a low-cost, small-footprint prototype of an semi-automated mushroom production facility that could be easily set up and utilized anywhere, even densely populated areas.

    Thanks to a Georgia Department of Agriculture grant, the current version of the production process is taking place in a shipping container at the KSU Field Station, a 25-acre property two miles from the Kennesaw campus. Dr. Gabriel designed the embedded environmental control system with software he developed, Mycodo, which can autonomously monitor and regulate the growing conditions for mushrooms – temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Research Video

     

 

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